Nevada SchoolPerformance Framework

The NSPF FAQ


What is the ESEA Flexibility Waiver?

States were provided the opportunity to apply for flexibility from the Federal system of Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) because it had become outdated. With expectations nearing 100% proficiency, AYP was no longer able to distinguish between schools that were truly struggling and those that, while not as high-performing as desired, did not truly have whole school failure. Schools received either a pass or a fail determination and too many schools were being identified as failing.

What is the Nevada School Performance Framework (NSPF)?

In July 2012, Nevada's ESEA Flexibility request was approved officially marking an end to the school accountability system known as Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP). AYP has now been replaced by the Nevada School Performance Framework (NSPF). The NSPF is an integral component of the Educator Performance System that defines the State's shift away from AYP to a five-star classification approach, with schools earning a rating of 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5 stars.

The Nevada School Performance Framework (NSPF) is Nevada’s new school accountability system. It moves away from labeling schools as failing when they aren't reaching the proficiency targets. The NSPF recognizes that nuances exist in school performance and that rating every school as passing or failing is not singularly helpful. The NSPF classifies schools within a five-star performance rating system. The system does not give schools a "pass" and it doesn't re-set the clock. The NSPF includes multiple measures of student achievement and growth and aligns the designations for schools to the delivery of appropriate supports and rewards.

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Is the Nevada School Performance Framework less rigorous than the previous system?

Nevada’s system actually holds more schools and students accountable than the AYP system did. For example, by calculating a minority disaggregated group in the Nevada School Performance Framework reports, as opposed to the calculations required for AYP, nearly all minority students in the state are included in accountability determinations. The State's NSPF system accounts for a larger percentage of students in subgroups than AYP.

How is the Nevada School Performance Framework different from AYP?

Nevada’s next generation accountability system is more comprehensive than AYP, moving beyond a focus on proficiency on State assessments and graduation rates. The NSPF incorporates performance on multiple measures of achievement including proficiency, student growth, growth to target, reductions in achievement gaps, and college- and career-readiness indicators, including graduation rate and scores on national college-readiness assessments. This system provides a more complete look at schools’ and districts' success in moving students to college and career readiness.

How is the Nevada School Performance Framework Reported?

Nevada's public schools will receive an index score and a star rating under the NSPF. Use the search feature and pull-down menus above to find your school and view your school's NSPF report.

For elementary and middle schools, star ratings in the NSPF are based on student growth, proficiency, subgroup performance gaps, and average daily attendance. High school ratings are based on student proficiency, subgroup performance gaps, growth, graduation rates, college and career readiness, and other indicators. For all schools, the NSPF will provide actionable feedback to schools and districts to help determine if current practices are aligned to improve educational outcomes for all students.

How is the Nevada School Performance Framework (NSPF) index score computed?

The NSPF index score is a score out of one hundred for a school. Index scores are comprised of the total points earned across several indices. Elementary and middle school indices consist of student growth, proficiency, subgroup performance gaps and other indicators while high school indices consist of student proficiency, subpopulation performance gaps, growth, graduation, career and college readiness and other indicators.

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How are star ratings determined?

Star ratings are generally referred to as school “classifications”. The NSPF index score is divided into five score ranges that correspond to star ratings, where five stars is the highest rating. The basis for the five score ranges is the index scores determined using information from the 2010-2011 school year. The overall index values for the schools at the 90th percentile then formed the basis for the point range for 5-Star schools. Conversely, the schools among the lowest 5% of schools within the NSPF formed the basis for a 1-Star rating. Continuing in this manner, a 4-Star rating represents schools in the 75th to 89th percentile range, a 3-Star rating represents schools within the 25th to 74th percentiles and 2-Star schools fall between the 5th and 24th percentiles.

What is a Focus School?

Focus is one of three possible school “designations”. To be identified as a Focus elementary or middle school, a school must be among the lowest performing schools based on the NSPF index points for the subgroup calculations for Adequate Growth Percentiles (AGP) in reading/ELA and mathematics in the current year. To be identified as a Focus high school, a school must be among the lowest performing high schools based on the NSPF index points for the subgroup calculations for graduation and proficiency in reading/ELA and mathematics. Only schools meeting the qualifying criteria for a school designation will receive one, therefore, not all Nevada schools have a designation.

What is a Priority School?

Priority is one of three possible school “designations”. To be identified as a Priority elementary, middle, or high school, a school must be among the lowest performing schools based on the NSPF index points in reading/ELA and mathematics earned in the areas of Performance (Status) and Progress (Growth) during the current year. Only schools meeting the qualifying criteria for a school designation will receive one, therefore, not all Nevada schools have a designation.

What is a Reward School?

Reward is one of three possible school “designations”. Reward schools are identified as being among the highest performing schools for achievement on the State assessments (High Performance), growth over time on the State assessments (High Progress) and, for high schools, excellent graduation rates (High Performance – Graduation). Elementary and middle schools who are both High Performance and High Progress schools will be designated as Exemplary. High schools who are High Performance, High Progress and High Performance – Graduation will be designated as Exemplary. Only schools meeting the qualifying criteria for a school designation will receive one, therefore, not all Nevada schools have a designation.

What is an index score?

In the NSPF, the index score is a score on a scale from 1 to 100 for a school. Index scores are comprised of the total points earned across several indicators. Elementary and middle school indicators are based on student growth, subgroup performance gaps and other indicators while high school indicators are based on student proficiency, subgroup performance gaps, growth, graduation, college and career readiness and other indicators. Due to school size limitations, some schools earn an adjusted index score. Index scores are associated with star ratings, or classifications. For example, a school that earns 81 index points is classified as a five star school.

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Why did my school receive an Adjusted Index score?

An adjusted index score allows all schools to be rated on an index score out of 100. The adjusted index score is applied to Nevada schools that are missing one or more performance measures. Missing indicators are typically due to small student populations for the measure in question. Thresholds, called n-counts, must be set prior to computing each performance indicator. Should that n-count fall below the predetermined limits, the value is not computed. Therefore, schools that are missing one or more performance measures due to an insufficient number of students will receive an adjusted index score.

How are Adjusted Index scores computed?

An adjusted index score is calculated by taking the school’s total points earned and dividing that number by the total points the school is eligible for. That number is then multiplied by 100. The number shown will be the school’s total adjusted index score. Adjusted index scores will be identified by a red asterisk.

What are the Test Participation Penalties?

Historically, participation rates on Nevada State assessments are at 99%. Participation on these assessments is important because it helps ensures equal access to educational opportunity as well as well as enables meaningful measurement of academic performance. To ensure that this high standard continues, Nevada has established participation rate penalties for schools that test fewer than 95% of its eligible student population. As such, Nevada describes two separate participation penalties. The first penalty addresses schools that test fewer than 95% of their entire eligible student population (All Students Group) in Reading or Mathematics. The second penalty pertains to schools that test less than 95% of any one of their ESEA subgroup (Subgroups) populations in Reading or Mathematics.

All Students Group Penalty: For any school that tests fewer than 95% of its eligible student population in a single school year, a secondary analysis will be conducted with a two- or three-year weighted average of participation rates at that school. If none of these analyses result in a participation rate of 95%, the school will be identified as a 1-Star school regardless of its NSPF index value.

Subgroup Penalty: The ten ESEA subgroups consist of students on individualized education plans (IEP), who receive or reduced-price lunch (FRL), who are English language learners (ELL) and each of Nevada’s seven identified race/ethnicities. To ensure that the current high participation standard for all of these subgroups continues, for any school that tests fewer than 95% of any ESEA subgroup population in a single school year, a secondary analysis will be conducted with a two- or three-year weighted average. Schools failing to meet the ESEA subgroup participation rate of 95% and failing to meet the average participation rate of 95% over the most recent two or three years for the first year will be publically identified as failing this important metric. If the school fails to meet the ESEA subgroup participation rate of 95% and fails to meet the weighted average calculated participation rate of 95% over the most recent two or three years for a second consecutive year, the Status Indicator measure of the school rating will be reduced by a total of six points. If a school fails to meet the ESEA subgroup participation rate of 95% and fails to meet the average participation rate of 95% over the most recent two or three years for a third consecutive year will earn zero points for the Status Indicator (elementary and middle schools) or Achievement/Status Indicator (high schools).

More information about participation penalties can be found in Nevada’s ESEA Waiver.

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When do school ratings come out?

The Nevada School Performance Framework is made publicly available each September 15th for the previous school year.

Why do the proficiency rates on the performance page of the NSPF differ from the rates on the Nevada
Report Card?

There is a different methodology used for computing the proficiency rates on the CRT and the HSPE between the NSPF and the Nevada Report Card. In the NSPF, the rate is determined by dividing the number of proficient students by the number of students tested, where the Nevada Report Card rates are determined by dividing the number of proficient students by the number of students who should have taken the assessments. The rates displayed on the Other Data and Trends page of the NSPF use the proficiency rates from the Nevada Report Card; so, in some instances, there may be slight differences between the rates on these two pages of the school report.

How can I learn more about Nevada's School Performance Framework (NSPF)?

The NSPF is designed to fairly and accurately measure school performance. As such, it has many components and is based on sophisticated mathematics. The glossary tab present on each web page of the NSPF provides descriptions of the terms used. Additionally, the performance page for each school’s report contains interactive text boxes for terms that may require further explanation. Finally, Nevada’s ESEA Flexibility Waiver can be accessed through the link on the NSPF landing page.

How do I find my school's report?

Data for a school may be accessed using either the drop down box or the search box located on the top left of the screen. To jump to a specific school’s reports, first click on the school district name in the “Select a District” drop down box and then click on the individual school from the alphabetical drop down list in the “Select a School”’ box. School reports may also be accessed by typing the school’s name, or part of the name, in the search box and clicking “Search.” When viewing a list of schools, click on the name of the school to view that school’s reports.

How can I print or save a report?

The report can be printed or saved as a webpage directly from the browser window. It can also be printed and/ or saved as a PDF file by clicking the “PDF” link on the top right of the screen.

Can I look at more than one school at a time?

Yes. If a user selects a district, all districts, or all schools in State from the “Select a District” drop down box, they will be able to view a table of the selected districts and/or schools with customizable summary level data for each. Users can click on the name of any school to see more detailed reports.

How do I customize the data displayed on the List View report?

To view different data for the districts and/or schools displayed on the List View report, click on the blue tabs just above the List View table. Within each tab you can check boxes for variables you wish to compare across districts and/or schools. Select a variable by clicking the box next to it. To select all variables in a section, click “Select All;” to deselect, click a checked box again or click “Reset” to deselect all checked boxes in a section. Once your desired variables are selected on any or all tabs, click “Apply Changes” to refresh the List View table with the new data.

Where can I find more data about school performance (Nevada Report Card)?

In compliance with the collection of data required by both federal and state law, the Nevada Report Card website will provide you with state, district and school level data accessible via customizable reports. Please access the site via nevadareportcard.com

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